Monday Morning Coffee with Mark

Antioch

January 17, 2022 Mark Roberts Season 2 Episode 3
Monday Morning Coffee with Mark
Antioch
Show Notes Transcript

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Welcome to the Westside church’s special Monday Morning Coffee podcast with Mark Roberts. Mark is a disciple, a husband, father and grand dad, as well as a certified coffee geek, fan of CS Lewis’ writings and he loves his big red Jeep. He’s also the preacher for Westside church.

Speaker 1:

Hello, and welcome to the Westside churches special Monday Morning Coffee podcast on this podcast, our preacher Mark Roberts will help you get your week started right. With look back at yesterday's sermon so that we can think through it further and better work the applications into our daily lives . Mark will then look forward into this week's Bible reading so that we can know what to expect and watch for. And, he may have some extra bonus thoughts from time to time. So grab a cup of coffee as we start the week together on Monday Morning Coffee with Mark.

Speaker 2:

Good morning. Good morning. Welcome to the Monday morning coffee podcast for January the 17th. I'm mark . And I am glad to welcome you this morning to the coffee podcast, because this is the podcast that's all about starting your week with a look back at yesterday's sermon. I just preached at west side , tap the show notes. If you need to listen to that sermon, then we're gonna add in a look forward to our Bible reading for the week. It's all about carrying the momentum of Sunday into Monday and beyond. I'm doing all of this, of course, with a cup of coffee and one hand my Bible in the other, a bunch of sermon notes and Bible reading notes, stacked all around everywhere. Let's get into it. Let's get cranking. Let's go to work. So it was a really exciting day yesterday at Westside because we started the preaching theme for 2022 . And what the elders have selected. What they've asked me to preach on this year is on various new Testament congregations, particularly the churches that were going to meet in conjunction with our reading of the apostle Paul's life and his epistles . As we spend this year with Paul, I really, really love this. The last year we spent in the sermon on the Mount and we were also reading in the gospel spending the year with Jesus. And there was just so many places where that just went together in such a great way. It was just wonderful. I felt like the pulpit was reinforcing what we were doing. Our daily bowel reading, our daily bowel reading was reinforcing what I was trying to do in the pulpit. It was just, it was just great. So this is an outstanding choice by the elders and it's gonna be, I think really, really exciting for us all year long, particularly cuz lots of times we read about these places in the new Testament and we may not know that much about that particular city. Some of these cities are pretty famous. Athens of course is pretty well known for example. But how much did you know about Antioch before that sermon yesterday? Yeah, I , I didn't know that much either. It's a really cool city. It's an amazing city. Third largest city in the Roman empire, absolutely to Politan it was a huge metropolitan area, lots going on there. So yesterday I made three main points about what we know of this church from the text largely in acts chapter 11 and then a little bit of acts chapter 13 first and foremost, this is a super evangelistic church. It's a church that's reaching out. It's a church then secondly, that was racially diverse. There's not any racism here. And , and racism is a huge part of the new Testament world. People are unapologetically racist and that is just being crushed by Christianity in the city of Antioch. And then finally Antioch was a very benevolent congregation sending benevolent funds to the brethren in Jerusalem. And that just goes well , that second point, because this is a church that is accepting everyone Jew or Gentile in the faith and they send this Gentile church, sends funds to their Jewish brothers in Jerusalem. That must have meant a lot to them. And it meant a lot more than just grocery money. It meant and drought relief, money, famine relief, money. It meant those brothers up there. They accept us and we need to accept them. And that's a huge part of what we're gonna see as we push forward in our reading. Paul, we're gonna get some of that as we get to acts 15 , uh , for example, that'll be a big play there. So let me give you just one additional idea here from acts chapter 11. Let me, let's just read this text a little bit and, and I , I just wanna make one more point to add to what I had yesterday. One of the things I love about this podcast is you always have stuff that ends up on the cutting room floor or , and the preachers thinking, oh, I really wanted to say this or look at this idea. That's in the text. I wanted to bring that out. You can't do that. We just be there forever, but I can give you one more point in the podcast on Monday morning. So those first 19 acts 1119, those who were scattered because of the persecution that arose over Steven traveled as far as FEA and Cy saying Antioch, speaking the word to no one except Jews, but there were some of them, men of Cypress and Irene who coming to Antioch, spoke to the heist , also preaching the Lord Jesus. And the hand of the Lord is with him and a great number who believed, turned to the Lord. And this report came to the years of the church in Jerusalem and they sent Barnabas to Antioch. When he came and saw the grace of God, he was glad and exhorted them all to remain faithful to the Lord with steadfast purpose for, he was a good man full of the holy spirit and of faith and a great many people were added to the Lord. So Barnabas went to Tarsis to look for Saul. And when he found him, he brought him to Antioch for a whole year. They met with the church and taught a great many people. And in Antioch, the disciples were first called Christians. Now I didn't talk about Barnabas and I didn't talk about Paul yesterday. We're gonna spend a lot of time with Paul as we spend the year with him, of course this year. So I really didn't want to go there, but I do want you to think about what they were doing at Antioch and why they came to Antioch. Maybe what stands out to us is three times. Luke says a great number , uh , return to the Lord that's in verse 21. And then in verse 24 and then in verse 26. But all of that comes because the gospel was being taught. The secret to the growth of the church at Antioch was the teaching and preaching of God's word, some unknown men of Cypress and Irene started that Barnabas continued it. Then he went and got Paul so they could do more of it. That's what grows the church, a con a constant commitment to the preaching and teaching of God's word. The gospel does the work and we need to hold onto that and we need to see that. And we need to believe that when the church decides that it has to put on a show to get a crowd, when the church decides that somehow we need to make the gospel more palatable. What we're really saying is we're not gonna do this the Antioch way in Antioch. What led everything was the preaching and teaching of the word of God. And that's why we have a podcast and that's why we have preaching. And that's why we have Bible classes. And that's why we have a website. And that's why we have zoom meeting on Tuesday. And that's why we're doing daily Bible operating because we believe in the power of the word of God. They believed it in Antioch. It made a huge difference in those people's lives. And that led to the church growing spiritually and then growing numerically. And that's what we want at west side . We want to be like Antioch. And that seems to me to be a giant play point of emphasis here in chapter 11, probably somebody came outta church yesterday saying, okay, those three points, whatever, whatever, how come he didn't say anything about that? That's what that, well, I can't say everything about everything, but that is Luke is certainly saying, look what the word of God can do when it is being preached and taught that results in the church in Antioch, growing and becoming stronger and numerically larger. Having said that, then let's think a little bit more about the church in Antioch because it is front and center in our daily Bible reading, let's get ready and let's have some notes and some discussion of what we'll be reading this week as we spend the year with Paul. So it's Monday morning and we're reading today in the book of acts, of course , acts chapter 11 versus 19 to 30, which I just read a whole big bunch of that already. So you've almost done your daily Bob reading today. We really have not seen much about Antioch prior to verse 19. One of the original deacons Nickolas and acts chapter six and verse five is from Antioch. And in a minute I'll note a text that may say Luke came from the Antioch church, but it really seems like the , probably the most important thing to say here is that there has not been a concerted effort to convert Gentiles after Peter converted, Cornelius, it doesn't seem like there is a big effort being made to bring more Gentiles in. And that is precisely and exactly what goes on here in Antioch and the expression that Luke uses for that is the hand of the Lord verse 21. That is a common Luke in expression for conversion. Sometimes Luke will talk about faith in baptism like chapter eight, verse 13, chapter 16, verse 31. Sometimes it's repentance in baptism chapter two, verse 38. Yes. Sometimes it's just faith. Chapter eight, verse 17, chapter nine, verse 42. Sometimes it's just repentance chapter nine, verse 35. Sometimes it's just baptism chapter eight, verse 38 or chapter nine, verse 18. Luke has a number of different ways of expressing that people come to the Lord and become Christians. And here it's the hand of the Lord. And so Barnabas then is sent verse 22. That's about 300 miles from Jerusalem up to Antioch to help these brethren. And the result of that then verse 24 is that many people were added to the Lord. Now, what does that remind you of? It needs to remind you of the day of Pentecost and acts chapter two, because that's the term that Luke used in acts chapter two and verse 41, 3000 were added that day. And then the Lord added under them acts chapter two, verse 47. Those that were being saved. And what Luke is saying, what the holy spirit is saying here is that what happened at Antioch is what happened on the day of Pentecost. People bull were saved. The church began here in this place. It's a Pentecost like event for Antioch. God is with this. Maybe some of those early readers be reading this and thinking, wait , wait , wait. We're converting Greeks. We're converting Gentiles. We're converting those Antioch people. I don't know about that. Nope, God is accepting them. They're being added just like were in acts chapter two . Now it's about a hundred miles to Tarsis and Barnabas first 25 goes to Tarsis to look for Saul. We don't know what Paul was or Saul, depending on what side of that you want right now, we just don't know what Paul was doing during this time. He may have been preaching back home. Some of the stuff that he mentions in San Corinthians, chapter 11, where Paul has a long list of some of the trials and traves and troubles that he's known in his life. Some of that doesn't match up with anything that we know about in acts . So of course, that leads to speculation that maybe those things happened during the time between these conversion and this event here in acts chapter 11. Wish I knew more about that, particularly because I'm trying to come up the year with Paul reading schedule and I'd like to know where to slot some stuff, or I'd like some more information on some of that stuff. We'll just have to do the best we can with, with where we are on that. We don't know what Paul was doing in Tarsis during that time is the bottom line to all of that. But he comes to Antioch for 26 and they are teaching people and a great many people turn to the Lord. Yes. Their call Christians here for the very first time. I I'm alluded to this in the sermon on Monday. This does seem to be as best we can tell a label that is being applied to them from outsiders, maybe even derisively. And always, someone's always gonna ask me about, well, Hey, Isaiah says that they're gonna have a new name, Isaiah 62 2 , and that's not it. Okay. Isaiah 62 2 is certainly a prophecy, but Isaiah goes on to say that the new name will be Heba , not Christian. So that's not the passage that you want right here. And this probably is a place where people were looking at this new religion and saying, they're, they're all about Christ. They're always talking about Christ. They're the Christians. And that seems to be where that comes from. Then we move on a little bit further verse 27 in those days, prophets came down from Jerusalem. And so here we have this benevolent section and this is a place where some manuscripts have we, which would place Luke as a member of the church at Antioch. We'll get in acts later on some very famous places where Luke uses we, and it is obvious that he is traveling with Paul and giving us an eyewitness account in some manuscripts what's, what's known as the Western text family. There is a we here now, why isn't that appearing in your Bible? I talked about this a little bit. Last Wednesday when I had a question out of acts nine, why the text of the new king, James has some extra words in verse five and the ESV and the new American standard do not. And that comes down to text families. The king James Bible is based on some manuscripts known as the Western text families and those manuscripts they're they're high quality manuscripts. Those are good manuscripts. There's no doubt about that. And the king James is a remarkable translation. God's hand was surely upon that. So an unbelievably good document considering particularly the manuscripts that they had and considering the manuscripts that they did not have that Western tech family is the basis for the king James. And it is the, is then for the new king James, because the new king James isn't a new translation, they didn't start from scratch, gather up all the manuscripts they could find and go to work on this thing. They just revised what the king James version had already put in place, updated some of the language where it was archaic and difficult to understand, but the king James and the new king James, the , the they're working off that Western text, that's where they are. And that text has the we, well, the manuscripts that have been discovered since 1611, when the king James Bible was translated, we have some much better manuscripts, older, better quality , uh , more authentication, all the things that the text experts are looking for, and those manuscripts don't have a we here and they don't have the rest of acts nine five. And, and they don't have acts 8 37 . I mentioned that in Q and a morning. And so your ESV and your new American standard, aren't gonna contain those texts. They're gonna be in anx . They're gonna be in a marginal note, you know, that kind of thing. And sometimes that really wigs people out. But remember we want the best text. The king James is not this standard. That's not it. The question is what do the ancient manuscripts say? And if they dig up a manuscript tomorrow and they roll over there to acts chapter 11 and there's a, we, well, that'll probably change what theb and the Nu American standard people are doing. But at this time, their judgment is as best they can tell that that's probably not the best text and that's why they're translating it in that way. Finally, let me just tell you this. There are, in those days, verse 28, ABA stood and said, there's gonna be famines. And we have great records outside of the Bible, that there was a bunch of famines during this time. And that may help us this , this could be as early as 41 in Paul's life, or maybe as late as 46. It's gonna kind of depend on how you line up the visits that are mentioned in Galatians and the visits that are mentioned in acts and acts. There are three visits to Jerusalem that Paul makes acts nine, acts 11 and acts 15, but in Galatians, he only mentions two. So when we get to Galatians , we'll sort through some of this some more, and we'll talk about, Hey, is this visit the acts nine visit? Is it the acts 11 visit? Is it the acts 15 visit which visit is which, and that of course would affect your chronology here. You just might make a note out on the side of your Bible. You're looking here maybe 41, maybe 45, 46, somewhere around in there. All right . That's, Monday's reading probably a great practice and probably many of you are doing this already. Just, just stop things right here and pick it up tomorrow. So press pause and I will see you tomorrow. So let's look at Tuesday's reading. Tuesday's reading is acts chapter 12 and verse 24 through acts 1312. And this is , uh , reading that , uh , we're just not real happy about. Dina did so much work to help me divide all of this up. And we agonized about this. I don't like to have you read across chapter divisions. It can be confusing. It can be difficult. Don't like that those big numbers there cause people to have little uncertainty here about what they're doing, but every now and then we're just gonna have to do that because Luke wrote without chapter divisions and this material, this unit of material goes together. So we're starting in acts chapter 12 and verse 24, the word of God increased and multiplied. That is that summary statement that Luke uses to indicate the conclusion of a section. And that is the end of section three in the book of acts, but Barnabas and SA returned from Jerusalem when they completed their service. And so they come back act to Antioch and they are ready to move forward with the Gentile mission. And this first Gentile mission is super important to Luke. Jesus had said that the gospel would be for everyone and to go into all the world and preach the gospel. And that dream has kind of been flirted with a little bit, but now it really reaches fruition because on this mission journey that acts 13 begins for the first time, we're gonna make direct approach to Gentiles who are in no way connected Judaism at all. We're just preaching the gospel out there to anybody and to everybody. And in some ways, Luke will parallel this to the earlier chapters in acts some of the difficulties and some of the troubles that the church encountered earlier, it kind of cycles back around. And we see that again, but particularly Luke highlights some interesting conversion stories, and I think he's making some specific points about that. And that begins in acts chapter 13. The church at Antioch sends out Paul and Barnabas and they are praying. This is the work of the holy spirit verse two , uh , belaying on of hands verse three shows agreement with this mission. And there is fasting people always ask about fasting. Fasting is the voluntary abstinence from food, usually associated with prayer. And usually it's about it's, it's a time management thing. It's about making more time to pray sometimes in a time of sorrow and lamentation. It can be just simply this isn't an appropriate time to eat, and I don't feel like eating, but here, this is about extra time in prayer. We're not gonna stop for lunch. We're gonna pray. And we're gonna send Paul and Barnabas on this enormously important preach tour in this preaching tour. In this first missionary journey, Paul begins more and more to take the lead. So just watch that and watch how Paul is more and more the central figure in these preaching stories. And this is the place that you want to get that map that's in the back of your Bible, almost all Bibles have a first missionary journey map in the back there, get that map out, make sure you're looking at that map. And you're seeing where we're going and what we're doing and where we are on the map. So they head off to Cyprus verse four X , 13, four. And the reason for that is that's Barnabas hometown. And it is a very important island. It had then a next to the Roman empire in 57 BC in 27 BC, it became a separate province. And then in 22, BC Augustus gave control to the Senate and it was administered by a proconsul as Luke shows, he knows proconsul rule peaceful provinces, which is why Judea is under proper , who reported to Caesarea . There was a lot of unrest there, but here, this is going to be under the control of a proconsul and there is a SORC here, and he has the mind of the proconsul and has , uh , managed to dominate him and impress him. Paul has a confrontation with him , clearly demonstrates that he is not the kind of person that you want to listen to. He is a son of the devil verse 10, talk about strong language there. And in fact, in verse nine, it says Saul, who was also called Paul as filled with do these spirit remembering and reminding us , uh , uh , remembering it's reminding us here of Steve . And this is the last time he is called Saul in the book. And the result of that is the proconsul who is given verse seven as a man of intelligence becomes a Christian. And so Luke has shown us two powerful and important men , a Centurian Cornelius, and now a ProCon. They are are Christians. Wow. Christianity, can't be such a horrible thing. That's undermining the Roman empire. If people like this are becoming Christians, Luke is saying smart people, examine the evidence, listen to the gospel and say, that's right. And I wanna be part of that. I wanna be a Christian. That's our reading for Tuesday. See you tomorrow. So in Wednesdays reading, we'll be reading acts chapter 13 versus 13 to 21. And the journey here is continuing two big things happen here. One of which is John mark leaves. We don't know why. And there is a, a ton of speculation about that. He was homesick. He only planned to go. As far as Cypress, he became physically ill. We know that Paul got ill here. Galatians chapter four tells us some people say he was unprepared for the rigors of the trip, or he got unhappy that Paul not his cousin Barnabas was taking the lead . We don't know. We don't know. So let's just limit our speculation about that. The good news is that Paul and John mark are reconcile second Timothy four chapter , uh , check four verse 11. And so we don't have to, to worry about that, that that loose end gets tied up. The other big event here is that Paul preaches a sermon. We only get three sermons of Paul's in the book of acts. There's this one. Then there's one in chapter 14 and beginning of verse 15. And then there's the sermon in chapter 17 to the people of Athens. This is a marvelous, marvelous sermon. It is enormously Jewish, cuz it is in a synagogue and that reflects the typical pattern for Paul's work. Paul will go to town. He finds a synagogue, Hey, that's where the people are, who are like-minded who accept the same Bible that Paul accepts the old Testament scriptures. Of course, that is the Bible of that time. He's gonna find those people there. They're looking for the Messiah. That's the beginning place. So Paul will go to the synagogue and he'll preach there. Then typically he's gonna be refused and then he'll make a direct appeal to the Gentile. So watch for that pattern. As we're reading along and act, he now is in Antioch of Pisidia verse 14, not Antioch of Syria, where I preached Sunday. This is Antioch of Pisidia. This is about a hundred miles north of Perga. It's about 3,600 feet above sea level . It's on a plateau in Augustus Caesar had settled about 3000 army veterans and their families here. And so this town was a little Rome , very Roman in its dress and architecture in coinage. It was the most important city in Southern gala Galatia. That's that province there like a state. And Paul comes here because Paul likes to start in the major city for an area. Paul will identify the leading city in an area and he goes there. The gospel can radiate out from there. And here he goes, he goes to the synagogue, verse 14. And there's the reading of the law and the prophets. And then there's the time for the sermon. And Paul stands up and he preaches this really Jewish that just talks about what God has done. Notice verse 16 though. Paul says men of Israel and you who fear God, men of Israel are the Jews sitting in the synagogue. You who fear God are the God fearers. Those are Gentiles. Those are Greeks who have not gone full pros, Aite, but they have attached themselves to the synagogue. They agree with the Jews about the one God concept they've left idle worship. They accept the scriptures. These people are kind of second tier members. If you will, they're not full members of the synagogue cuz they haven't been circumcised, but they're there. They're they're part of that. They're are believers at some level and they become an important element from here on, in , in the book of acts because as Paul comes and says to those kinds of people, Hey, guess what? You don't have to be second class citizens in God's eye eyes anymore. They greedily and hungrily eat up the word of God. Hey, I can be in the kingdom of God. I can be right with God. This is incredible. And of course there'll be a lot of problems as Jews see that element, those people in the synagogue evacuating out of there going to Paul and this new teaching of Christianity that is gonna hack them off. We're losing people and that will create a lot of temp , a lot of tension. So then there's a huge emphasis in this sermon, what God has done. He chooses the people of Israel . He chooses the patriarchs. He redeemed Israel from Egypt. He gave them Canan, there's all the work that God has done. And there's so much work here, particularly in tomorrow's reading on the prom misses of God. We'll notice some of that as we move forward into tomorrow's reading, but we're just reading today. We're just reading through verse 21, where they asked for a king and God gave them SA. So here Paul is recounting Israelite history, cuz he wants to walk them up to the giving of the Messiah, the sending of the Messiah. That's our reading for today. I'll see you tomorrow. So for Thursday's reading, we'll read acts 1322 to 31. As we continue to listen to Paul preach in the synagogue at Antioch of Pisidia. Let me get a little more coffee going here and let's see if we can work a little further into this sermon. Here we begin our reading in verse 22, that references David, the man after God's own heart, he is the ideal king. He is the one who served God in the best way, which opens the door. Then to verse 23 of this man's offspring, God has brought to Israel, a savior Jesus, as he promised that second Samuel seven. And that really is the theme verse to this sermon Jesus, the Messiah of the lineage of Abraham, of the lineage of David. He is the one that the prophets have spoken of. He is of the stump of Jesse , Isaiah chapter 11. He is the one that if you've been reading your by people who are listening to me, preaching the synagogue, Paul says you've been looking for and John, the Baptist pointed to him, verse 24, John seems to have been a pretty famous fellow . And so Paul from time to time will need to deal with John the Baptist, not being the Messiah, but he is not the Messiah. He points to the Messiah. And so he begins to sum up in verse 26, sons of the family of Abraham and those among you, who's that that's Jews, sons of the family of Abraham and those among you. That's those, the people in Jerusalem verse 27 failed. I don't want you to fail like they failed. So there's an appeal here kind of to, Hey, we can do better than that bunch of Jerusalem. They blew it. They missed the Messiah. They fouled everything up, but you can get on board with the Messiah and watch how the gospel is spelled out in 28, 29, 30 in 31, Jesus died verse 28. He was buried verse 29. He raised from the dead verse 30. And we are witnesses of that in verse 31. That's the gospel message that we've heard over and over in the book of acts. And we're gonna continue to hear in the book of acts that Lee for tomorrow to hear the exciting conclusion to this sermon. That's our reading for Thursday in the book of acts. So our Bible reading for Friday then is acts chapter 13 versus 32 to 42. The conclusion to Paul's sermon. And this really highlights some of the ideas that Paul loves so much and that figures so prominently in his EPIs . One of the things that we wanna do is we spend the year with Paul is we want see some of this stuff. Cause Paul doesn't just sit down with Galatians and all of a sudden he's ripping off new ideas. Hey, hand me some Papyrus . I'm gonna write Roman to a whole bunch of new doc . Of course not all of this has been in Paul's of mind and is there by the inspiration of the holy spirit has been working and here we hear some of those notes sounding very early in the symphony. If you will, as Paul finishes this sermon verse 32, we bring you the good news that this is what God promised to the fathers. Paul's favorite theme is that Christians are the best Jews. They believe the scriptures and hold on to the real promises of God. The worst Jews are those who deny the promises of God by not accepting the Messiah. So then you get a Psalm two quote , you get a second Samuel quote. This really starts sounding like verse 36. It really sounds like Peter at the day of Pente. And then Paul really comes forward with his ideas and his thinking verse 39, everyone who believes is freed from everything from which you could not be freed by the law of Moses. That sounds a lot like Galatians. That sounds a lot like Romans and please underline in your Bible. Everyone don't, you know, Gentile ears, perked up, everyone, everyone. I can be freed and forgiven of my sins, verse 38 without becoming part of the law of Moses and submitting to yet . Wow, that is huge. So Paul closes verse 41 with a quote from Haba one five . That's a passage that , uh , was held to be messianic and to speak of the work of God and what God is doing. And that our reading then ends in verse 42. The people begged these things might be told them the next Sabbath. Well, of course they did. We wanna know more. We wanna know more about how we can be right with God, how we can participate in the kingdom of God, how we don't need the law of Moses, how we don't need these Jews who look down on us and all their racist ideas and, and how we're always treated as if we don't really belong. Hey, we can be full members of the kingdom of God. We can be right with God. Tell us more. Paul, tell us more. Tell us more, tell more. And then of course, on Monday in the reading, then we'll get our first look at what happens when you have a bunch of fired up Gentiles who are ready to become Christians. And you've got a bunch of Jews who aren't ready to accept the gospel and turn to Jesus. The Messiah we'll think more about that on Monday, but that's our reading for Friday. I'll be doing on Facebook. There'll be a video posted there, read along with me then. And I'll answer the questions that are on the back of our reading schedule. And we'll work through those together on Facebook on Friday. I'll just say, thanks for listening to the Monday morning coffee podcast. If you love this podcast, we would certainly appreciate it. If you would subscribe, follow rate and give a review on whatever app that you are listening on, that helps more folks find the podcast. We'd really appreciate it. If you would recommend it to someone else. I hope you see this as an evangelistic opportunity. A lot of people are uncertain about reading the Bible for themselves. They're not sure where to start. They're not sure what to do. You could be a friend to somebody and say, Hey, I'm doing in this. You can do this too. Let's do this together. Here's a resource that will help you. We can talk about it. We can work on this together. Many, many people know about the apostle Paul as being a central figure in Christianity. But how many people really know Paul? How many people have read the Bible to come to know Paul? That's what we are doing. Encourage others to do that. And I hope you'll use this podcast as is a resource that will assist you as you're encouraging and evangelizing and telling people about Jesus, the Christ. So until Monday, may your coffee be delightful? May the rest of your Friday be short and may the Lord be with you today all day. I'll see you on Monday morning.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for listening to the Westside church of Christ podcast. Monday morning coffee with mark. For more information about Westside, you can connect with us through our website, just christians.com to our Facebook page. Our music is from upbeat dot I that's upbeat with two PS , U P P B E a T , where creators can get free music. Please share our podcast with others. And we look forward to seeing you again with a couple of coffee , of course, on next Monday.